10 things I hate about you

Moviereviews.to will review and personally assess the movie 10 things I hate about you, one of the best romance and teen movies of all time.

I’m attempting to recollect the last film I saw that didn’t end with a secondary school prom. “Avaricious,” perhaps. Indeed, even the following film I saw, “Never Been Kissed,” closes with a prom. The secondary school sentiment classification has gotten so famous that it’s running out of novel thoughts and has taken to reusing exemplary writing. 

My associate James Berardinelli made top-notch as of late: “Dumbfounded” depended on Emma, “She’s All That” was motivated by “Pygmalion” and “Barbarous Intentions” was reused from “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” (inciting Stanley Kauffmann to see that it was better once upon a time when secondary school understudies were permitted to assume control over regional government for a day, rather than redoing French books). To this rundown, we may likewise add the film update of “Incredible Expectations” (1998), Cinderella’s actual story in “Ever After” and “Romeo + Juliet,” which was definitely not. There’s even “The Rage: Carrie 2”- – a retread of “Carrie,” a work that as I would like to think positions straight up there with the best of Austen, Shaw, and Shakespeare. 

Inspiration

“10 Things I Hate About You” is motivated by Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew,” in the very sense that “Starship Troopers” was roused by “Titus Andronicus.” It doesn’t revamp Shakespeare to such an extent as summon him like a charm, by setting its story at Padua High School, naming its characters Stratford and Verona, making one of the champions a vixen, and so on There is even a scene where the wench is allocated to rework a Shakespeare poem. 

But … well, the film is enchanting, regardless of its depleted wheeze of an old reused plot thought (kid accepts kickbacks to ask the young lady to prom, at that point finds that he truly prefers her- – however then she gets some answers concerning the payoff and detests him). I haven’t seen that thought in right around two months, since “She’s All That” (kid creates wager he can transform plain loner into prom sovereign, and does, yet experiences passionate feelings for her, after which she finds, and so on, and so on) 

Main content

The story this time includes two Seattle sisters. Bianca Stratford (Larisa Oleynik) is mainstream and wears a ton of red dresses. Her peevish more established sister Katarina (Julia Stiles) is disagreeable, never dates, and is the class mind. (At the point when the English instructor approaches his class for responses to a Hemingway epic, she snaps, “Hemingway was a drunkard who stayed nearby Picasso, planning to nail his leftovers.”) Two people need to take Bianca to the prom. One is timid and agreeable. The other is a boaster. However, Katarina’s dad (Larry Miller) has prohibited her to date until her more seasoned sister Kat begins going out. So they incubate a plot to convince Patrick (Heath Ledger), the school ban, to ask her to the prom. He accepts kickbacks, however then understands that Kat is quite stunning, and so forth, and truly begins to look all starry eyed at her, after which, and so on 

Review and analysis

I think we basically need to dump the whole plot and like the exhibitions and probably the jolliest scenes. I enjoyed the soul of the secondary teachers. Allison Janney is the sex-distraught instructor, and Daryl “Chill” Mitchell is the English educator who plays out Shakespeare’s pieces as though they were rap verses. (I have news for you: They function admirably as rap, and I expect the collection quickly.) I additionally loved the sweet, conditional inclination among Ledger and Stiles. He has a scene that carries the entire film to a charming stop. Attempting to win her heart, he holds up until she’s on the athletic field, and afterward sings “I love you child” over the P.A. framework, having paid off the school’s walking band to go with him. Those scenes merit the cost of confirmation – nearly. However, at that point, different scenes are a drag. 

All adolescent motion pictures have at any rate one exhausting and perpetual gathering scene, in which everybody is fiercely dressed, alcoholic, and steadily vivid (in “Never Been Kissed,” a portion of the children come as the Village People). These scenes definitely include (a) a battle, (b) barfing, and (c) a sorrowful sentimental separation before everyone. That scene was dreary, as was where the eventual sweethearts toss paint inflatables at one another. I know there must be a scene of lighthearted, beautiful skip around, yet as I watched them focusing on paint each other’s hair, I started to long for that old reserve, the compulsory Tilt-a-Whirl ride. 

I loved the film’s soul, the entertainers, and a portion of the scenes. The music, a lot of it by the band Letters to Cleo, is inconspicuous and creative while still merry. The film however not exactly accomplishes takeoff against the gravitational draw of the drained story equation. Now and again it’s a mix-up to have acting this beguiling; the characters become so captivating and unconstrained, we notice how they’re caught in the plot.

Life lessons from the movie

10 Things I Hate About You has more than that. It is special, and continues special, in such a way that the single explanation cannot fully explain it. Perhaps it is thanks to the profound lines that many of them have not been fully quoted to this day. Or perhaps it’s the soundtrack – nostalgic music that has the potential to take you time travel whenever you listen to it again. Or maybe it was simply because of Heath Ledger who stole our hearts when he walked into Perky’s office and joked: “Can I turn off the lights?”

1. DON’T FEEL THE PRESSURE WHEN YOU DO NOT JOIN THE CROW

If one thing immediately caught the eye, it was that Kat Stratford didn’t play by the rules. We first met Julia Stiles’s iconic character when she was driving through town, exploding in the music of “I don’t give a damn ’bout my bad reputation”, glancing at the girls. famously in a convertible that dared to look at her. While the girls can easily be caught up in high school trends and pressures, Kat serves as a reminder of the difference. The life lesson here is, just live the way you want, no matter what other people think of you.

2. AT THE SAME TIME, LET OTHERS SEE WHO YOU REALLY ARE

Throughout the movie, what Kat presents is a “front” without a flinch, fear. Her character is the ideal model of someone strong, resilient, and independent. However, in the touching scene at the end of the film, she turned to Patrick when she read the self-written poem in tears. For a character who spends most of his time hiding his true emotions, when crying and depressed, Kat cares how deeply Kat cares for Patrick.

This scene serves as a life lesson, reminding us of the importance of showing others who we are. Crying is okay, even in a crowded place. And certainly don’t mind when admitting “I hate you can’t hate you, even just a little, after all”.

3. NO PROBLEMS THAT MUSIC CAN’T SOLVE

We all have a way of dealing with the stresses of everyday life, and for Kat, it’s about going to our favorite band’s concerts. Whenever you feel overwhelmed, think about Kat’s nervous times. In that brief moment, someone’s music played and alleviated a little sorrow. Whether you choose a rocking punk or like something soothing on the ear, 10 Things I Hate About You shows us a well-known life lesson that music can make one day. worse becomes milder.

4.HOW MAGICAL THIS LIFE WILL BE WHEN YOU CAN FIND YOUR SOULMATE FROM STRANGERS

Let’s think about the main duo to talk about Kat’s best friend Mandella. Her whole conspiracy was all towards the ball with William Shakespeare, even though he had passed away for centuries. It turns out that her real Shakespeare was Michael, Cameron’s best friend, and “tactical” advisor. Those two lovely eccentricities are sure to have a real-life version out there somewhere in this world.

5. DON’T EVER UNDERESTIMATE THE STRENGTH OF THE COMPONENCE

Joey may be a handsome guy famous for dozens of model contracts, but in the end, Cameron himself captured Bianca’s heart. Sure Cameron isn’t perfect (he bribed Patrick to flirt with Kat to date his sister), but being kind is clearly one of the most treasured qualities, and he even teaches Bianca a lot. good thing. It is also a life lesson, reminding us to judge things through inner beauty, not flashiness.

6. ALTHOUGH PARENTS ARE NOT ALWAYS RIGHT, THEY CAN ALWAYS DO EVERYTHING FOR THEIR CHILDREN

First of all, there’s no denying that Kat’s father certainly has some sexist views. But apparently, he did it all for his two daughters. Walter’s attempt at father-daughter conversations can be flawed, and even a little dated (not dating until graduation). But in the end, we learn a life lesson: Parents always love their children and want to protect them as much as possible in their arms.

7. CHERISH YOUR SIBLINGHOOD

Throughout the movie, Kat and Bianca often argue or ignore each other if they bump into each other on campus. The successive developments made both of them realize the importance of each other and opened up hidden lurks in the past. Their rocky and loving relationship teaches us to trust our brothers and sisters, for it is the safest mental support.

8. HEATH LEDGER IS A PRECIOUS PEARL DESERVING ETERNAL RESPECTS

The moment Heath sang the song Can take my eyes off you, with his professional dance moves and skillful microphone skills, made him one of Hollywood’s legends. And while he continued to show off his acting skills in other notable films, it’s hard to forget his role as the complicated and mysterious Patrick Verona in 10 Things I Hate About You. Without a doubt, Heath is a legend coming out of the Hollywood world, making fans’ hearts flutter.

9. FINALLY, BUT SURELY AN IMPORTANT PART, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LIKE AND LOVE

Surely you still remember Bianca’s “open goods”: “There is a difference between like and love. Because I like Skechers, but I love Prada bags ”. Thereby, we draw another life lesson: Liking is just a kind of feeling with beauty, so we can easily like a person at first sight, but love requires contact. , sticking. When recognizing the inner beauty, the visual “like” has turned into the “love” in terms of feeling.

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